CESMA News

CESMA NEWS
DECEMBER 2019
PRESIDENT: CAPT. H. ARDILLON, FRANCE
TEL : +33 2 35 801 505 MOB: +33 6 09 450 057
E-MAIL: hubert.ardillon@afcan.org; hubert.ardillon@orange.fr
DEPUTY PRESIDENT: CAPT. D.DIMITROV, BULGARIA
MOB : +359 888340160
E-MAIL :mitko652012@gmail.com; mitko652012@yahoo.com
VICE PRESIDENT: CAPT. G. RIBARIC, SLOVENIA
TEL/FAX: +386 56772642 MOB: +386 31 375 823
E-MAIL: zpu.slo@siol.net; jrg.ribaric@gmail.com
GEN.SECRETARY: VACANCY
TEL/FAX: …………………….. MOB: …………………….
E-MAIL : ………………………
HON.TREASURER: VACANCY
TEL/FAX: …………………….. MOB: …………………….
E-MAIL : ………………………
HON.VICE PRESIDENTS: CAPT. R. SERRA =
CAPT. W.VON PRESSENTIN
HON.MEMBERS: CAPT.F.V.WIJNEN = CAPT. H.B. BOER =
CAPT. J. CHENNEVIERE = CAPT. J-D. TROYAT
CAPT. G. KIEHNE CAPT. J. JUAN
TORRES
ADVISORS: PROF. J. SPAANS CAPT. W. MUELLER
E-MAIL: cesma-eu@introweb.nl
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IFSMA 45th General Assembly, HELSINKI -
Finland 26 & 27 september 2019
IFSMA held its General Assembly at Helsinki, Finland, on the invitation of
FSOU (Finnish Ship’s Officers Union).
The Assembly started with some welcome words from Johan RAMSLAND,
president of FSOU, followed by the president of IFSMA, Hans SANDE.
Having adopted the agenda, the annual activities and financial reports were
read. The election of three new vice-presidents closed the first morning. There
were four candidates for three vice-president positions and the vote was conducted
under the new IFSMA vote rule with each association having a different number of
votes (from 1 to 9) based upon the number of captains it represents. The three new
vice-presidents that were elected are : Juan GAMPER (Nautilus CL - Chili), Sune
BLINKENBERG (DMO - Danemark) and Oleg GRYGORIUK (MTWTU - Ukraine).
Following the election, there was a discussion on the format (repartition of the
number of voices) of the election.
The main subject of these two days (except the first morning) was addressed
by some presentations as follows;Mr Tor HUSJORD (Maritime Forum North –
Norvège): SAREX.
SAR trainings in Norwegian waters.
80% of polar waters are under Norwegian SAR control and in case an incident
arises, which necessitates SAR, there are two major problems : the time needed to
be on site and the capacity for the persons in water to stay alive in very cold waters.
It is therefore necessary to arrive on site very quickly, and this depends on the
weather and the distance to go. The capacity to survive in cold water is dependent
on three factors : temperature, dehydration and fatigue. This last element is difficult
to be simulated during a drill.
After the drill SARiNOR2, four priorities were defined : to have a permanent
response base in Svalbard ; to increase the competency on navigation in icy
waters ; to have close monitoring of the area near Svalbard ; to prepare and to
train onboard an assistance vessel.
Following the drills from 2016, the conclusion of the forum can be writen in
few words: the polar code and the equipment are not enough for an efficient and
quick answer.
Among foreseen improvements is the testing of new radar. There is a difference
in term of radar reflection between a new ice and an old ice. The old ice is stronger
and contains less salt than new ice, so it reflects radar waves better.
During the summer of 2019, a ship not classified as an ice-breaker reached
the north pole by her own means sailing only by the detection of cracks in the ice
pack.
More information is available on the internet site ‘maritimt-forum.no’, however
it is in the Norwegian language.
Other presentations;
Corral bay, after the tsunami in 1960 by Juan CAMPER (Chile) ; Captain
returns to his Alma Mater by Kazuki INOUE (Japon) ; Human Element Interest
group (HEIG) by David APPLETON (UK) ; Regulatory Scoping exercise for MASS
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by Jim SCORRER (IFSMA SG) ; Safe Navigation in Malacca Strait by Dwiyono
SOEYONO (Indonesia) ; Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN) by Vives
MENON (Danemark) ; IMO MSC Guidelines on Fatigue by Paul OWEN (IFSMA
ASG) ; Overriding Authority and How to Defend It by Erik KRAVETS – Attorney in
Law ; Action & Control, Physical & Mental Action, Regulation of Activity or Freedom
of Actions by Dimtar DIMITROV (Bulgaria). The latter was already printed in the
last CESMA newsletter (September 2019).
Capt. Hubert Ardillon, CESMA President
American rescuer who saved four recognized
with IMO bravery accolade
Briefing: 29 26/11/2019
Petty Officer Michael Kelly, a rescue swimmer with the United States Coast
Guard, received the 2019 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea during this
year‘s IMO Awards ceremony (25 November)
Petty Officer Kelly was recognized for his courage, perseverance and skill in
rescuing four survivors from a life raft from a sinking fishing vessel, in extremely
high winds, battling huge waves to swim to rescue each survivor and get them
winched to safety.
Petty Officer Kelly, Aviation Survival Technician Second Class, Coast Guard
Air Station Cape Cod, United States Coast Guard, was nominated by the United
States of America for his part in the rescue operation in November 2018.
”I would not be here if it was not
for the amazing skills of my crew. Their
precision and focus allowed me to act as
a tiny cog in the large process of search
and rescue, that we are all so passionate
about and train for daily,” Mr. Kelly said.
”There is nothing more precious than
human life and we all strive to go home
to the ones we love.” – Petty Officer
Kelly, recipient of the 2019 IMO Award for
Exceptional Bravery at Sea.
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Accepting the award, Petty Officer Kelly said it was an immeasurable honour
and truly humbling to be recognised by the International Maritime Organization
(IMO), the global organization that sets the standards for maritime safety and
security. He acknowledged the teamwork involved in the rescue.
”I would not be here if it was not for the amazing skills of my crew. Their
precision and focus allowed me to act as a tiny cog in the large process of search
and rescue, that we are all so passionate about and train for daily,” Mr. Kelly said.
”There is nothing more precious than human life and we all strive to go home to
the ones we love.”
Four rescued from fishing vessel
On 14 November 2018, during heavy storms, the crew of the rescue helicopter
CG6032 was directed to provide assistance to the sinking fishing vessel Aaron and
Melissa II. The vessel‘s four crew members were abandoning ship in very severe
weather conditions, 70 miles off the Coast of Maine, United States.
After taking off, the helicopter crew immediately encountered very strong
turbulence and gusts up to 60 knots. Arriving on scene, the aircrew located a life
raft, battered by raging seas.
AST2 Michael Kelly was immediately deployed into the cold water. Battling
20-foot waves and chasing the raft, which was constantly being blown away by
50-knot winds, he finally managed to reach the anchor line and pull himself to the
life raft.
It was a critical situation, with all four survivors suffering from hypothermia.
Two were unable to swim, while the flooded raft was in danger of capsizing. With
great strength and stamina, AST2 Michael Kelly pulled each survivor from the raft,
one by one, swimming strongly through the storm to keep them afloat. Each was
lifted into the swaying rescue basket to be hoisted to safety.
After each rescue, AST2 Kelly was forced to regain lost ground, as the heavy
winds continued to push the raft further away. He fought through extreme weather
conditions, as well as physical and mental exhaustion, to save the lives of four
seafarers in distress.
The IMO Council in July agreed with a panel of judges that AST2 Kelly
demonstrated truly exceptional bravery and determination.
Certificates of Commendation
During the award ceremony, four certificates of commendation were also
presented:
• The members of the emergency rescue team of Guangzhou Salvage involved
in the rescue operation of the dredger Rong Chang 8, nominated by China,
The rescue team were involved in rescuing two people who had been trapped
for 55 hours inside the capsized dredger Rong Chang 8, which was drifting
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bottom up in the water. They were nominated by China for their tireless efforts
and courage in diving multiple times through debris for several hours, fighting
strong ocean currents.
Mr. Wang Hongwei, Maritime Councillor at the Embassy
of the People‘s Republic of China in London,
received the certificate on their behalf.
• Corvette Lieutenant of the Naval Infantry Juan Mateo Cabrera (posthumously).
He was nominated by Mexico, for sacrificing his own life while helping other
crew members to abandon their helicopter, which had crashed into the sea
during routine maritime surveillance operations. The helicopter was sinking
rapidly, but Lieutenant Cabrera managed to help three of his fellow crew
members to escape to the surface. Sadly, he did not survive the ordeal and
his body was recovered five days later.
Rear Admiral Leopoldo Jesús Díaz González Solórzano,
Alternate Permanent Representative of Mexico to IMO,
received the certificate on behalf of
Lieutenant Juan Mateo Cabrera‘s family.
• Captain Mioc Zeljko and crew of the M/V APL Vancouver, nominated by
Singapore, for the bravery, determination and professionalism displayed while
fighting a fire that broke out in a cargo hold and had quickly spread to the
containers on deck. Captain Mioc Zeljko and his crew tirelessly fought the fire
for more than 36 hours, keeping it under control until the arrival of fire-fighting
tugs and the Vietnamese Coast Guard. As a result of their courageous actions,
24 lives on board were saved, further damage to the ship was prevented and
a serious marine pollution incident was averted.
Captain Mioc Zeljko was at the ceremony
to receive the certificate
• Captain William Boyce and crew of the car carrier Green Lake, nominated
by the United States, for the exceptional seamanship, tenacity and leadership
demonstrated in rescuing seafarers from the car carrier Sincerity Ace who
had been forced to abandon ship due to a fire on board that had quickly got
out of control. The Captain of the Green Lake skilfully manoeuvred his 633-
foot long vessel safely alongside survivors in the water, in extreme weather
conditions of 30 knot winds and 25 foot waves. Over 18 hours, seven crew
members were rescued. At the same time, Captain Boyce coordinated rescue
efforts conducted by three other vessels assisting in the operation, saving the
lives of the other survivors.
Captain William Boyce was at the ceremony
to receive the certificate.
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Letters of Commendation
Letters of commendation have been sent to:
• Captain Huang Zhibin, Commander of the rescue helicopter B-7310,
Donghai Rescue Bureau, nominated by China, for the challenging rescue of all
nine crew members of the stranded ship Linfune 16, in the midst of Super Typhoon
Mangosteen.
• Lieutenant Commander Julien Kervago, Sub-lieutenant Alexandre
Guillet, Petty Officer Brice Jarreau and Petty Officer William Leprêtre, crew
of the helicopter Panther, Flotilla 36F, French Navy, nominated by France, for the
professionalism and expertise demonstrated in the rescue of six people, including
a five year old child, from the sailing vessel Jab de Mer, in heavy seas.
• Captain Manuel B. Balinquit, Master of the M/V Star Norita, nominated by
the Philippines, for rescuing two fishers from a sinking vessel and staying at the
scene until four more fishers were rescued by the MRCC Vladivostok rescue team.
• Captain Heo Yeong-il, Master of the fishing vessel 2017 Manseok,
nominated by the Republic of Korea, for rescuing 10 fishers from the flooding
vessel 3088 Moon Chang, which had collided with another fishing boat. Captain
Heo Yeong-il prevented the sinking of the vessel, thus avoiding serious damage to
the marine environment.
• The Captain and crew of the patrol vessel 3010, Gunsan Coast Guard
Station, Republic of Korea Coast Guard, nominated by the Republic of Korea, for
extinguishing a raging fire on board the fishing vessel Zhe Ling Yu 28925. The lives
of all eight crew members were saved and a serious marine pollution incident was
averted.
• Captain Oleg Goncharov, Master of the floating plant/fish factory vessel
Dalmos, nominated by the Russian Federation, for coordinating the rescue
operation of 10 crew members found in a life raft, after their ship sank, in severe
weather.
• Mr. Mykhailo Myroniuk, Second Officer of the tanker Anuket Amber,
nominated by Ukraine, for his leadership and great resolve after pirates took control
of the ship and kidnapped the Master, Chief Officer and 10 other crew members.
As the highest-ranking officer left on board, he took charge and navigated the
vessel to safety.
• The crews of the Motor Lifeboats MLB 47295 and MLB 47229, Station
Umpqua River, United States Coast Guard, nominated by the United States, for
their combined effort to rescue three survivors from their capsized recreational
vessel, in very rough seas and dangerous waters. There was significant debris and
the risk of grounding.
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IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea
This annual award was established by IMO to provide international recognition
for those who, at the risk of losing their own life, perform acts of exceptional bravery
in attempting to save life at sea or in attempting to prevent or mitigate damage
to the marine environment. Such acts of bravery may also involve extraordinary
seamanship skills in very difficult conditions or any other display of outstanding
courage. Nominations are scrutinized by an assessment panel made up of members
of nongovernmental organizations in consultative status with IMO, under the chair
of the Secretary-General. Subsequently, a panel of judges (made up of the Chairs
of several IMO bodies) considers the recommendations of the Assessment Panel
and selects the recipient.
http://www.imo.org/en/MediaCentre/PressBriefings
/Pages/29-Bravery-Award-2019-.aspx
IN MEMORIUM, ONE OF THE FOUR FOUNDING
FATHERS OF CESMA CAPTAIN JEAN CHENNEVIERE
2019 will have been a sad year for CESMA. After the passing of our General
Secretary, Captain Fredrik van WIJNEN, in June, one of the four founding fathers,
Captain Jean CHENNEVIERE, died on 13th October.
Capt. CHENNEVIERE, I could not name him by an other name even if I never
sailed with him, was for me more than a counsellor : a model and even a mentor,
for AFCAN and for CESMA.
The very first time I met him, during a regional meeting of AFCAN in Normandy
in 1994, he impresed me. He was not speaking for nothing, to tell his own and
old story. No, he had remarks, questions, ideas on the specific captain’s function,
on the safety at sea for vessel and crew. More, he had very clear and large
knowledge of the maritime law, french and/or european one. Knowledge which left
me speechless. I listened and I learned.
With another captain (Captain TROCHERIS being at that time the chief for the
Normandy) he insisted a lot for me to succeed them, but with them, in Normady.
Which happened a day.
But for captain CHENNEVIERE, to be and to stay in Normandy was not
enough. Often, very often, he told me that I have to go to CESMA. Each time, I
answered that I could not arguing that I was still at sea, which he understood. But
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as the hunter he was also, he came back to the question.
Jean CHENNEVIERE had an organizing soul, a sparkling spirit, but also fussy.
The drafting of CESMA statutes owes him a lot. To answer a question in a general
manner was not for him. He was keen to present a text which be clear, understable
and well done.
An other founder of CESMA, captain Gerhard KIEHNE, from VDKS, wrote
me, after being informed of his death : « When we worked together trying to get
CESMA under way, it very often was his well balanced opinion pointing us toward
progress ».
Of passion. Passion on maritime world, passion to very well end things. To
meet administration, journalists, to organise a General Assembly, such as the one
for IFSMA in 1988 in Le Havre. At that time he was vice-president of IFSMA. To
play an important role in the founding of CESMA. But we xan note that he denied
to be the first president of CESMA, arguing of his age.
Last years, he had physical problems. He was not able to come to our AFCAN
regional meeting in Le Havre, he has also serious problem of eyes. I called him by
phone time to time, probably not enough of course, but each time I phoned him,
I was really impressed after by his clear view of the situation we were speaking
about. And even if we were two french men speaking, each time he told me some
sentences in english, by memory or because he was just reading it in an english
magazine. And of course our discussion was mainly on CESMA news and affairs.
To God and Thanks a lot Captain CHENNEVIERE
Capt. Hubert ARDILLON, CESMA President
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European Maritime Day In My Country 2020 - submit your
event! Deadline: 31 January 2020
21/11/2019
In parallel with the European Maritime Day (EMD) Conference in Cork (14 &
15 May 2020), the EMD In My Country 2020 events will take place all over Europe
for the public at large (from April to June 2020).
During 2019, 145 events were organised in 23 different countries, attracting
25.000 participants, making a record in EMD history! For 2020 the focus will be on
youth activities. Read our call and submit your event before 31 January 2020.
Read more European Maritme Day website
https://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/press/european-maritime-day-mycountry-
2020-submit-your-event-deadline-31-january-2020_en
CESMA PRESENTATION IN ROMANIA
11th of October, 2019 upon the invitation of Romanian Shipmasters Association
(RSA) CESMA was presented in the initial general assembly in Dorna Restaurant
in Mamaia, Romania. The invitation came to the attention of CESMA board due
to contacts of Capt. Ivan Conev, Chairman of Bulgarian Shipmasters Association
with Capt. Marius Tutuianu, President of RSA. The initial general assembly was
combined with a seminar attended by more than 30 participants. The presenters
were from CESMA, the Bulgarian Shipmasters Association and local captains
and professors involved in maritime industry, maritime education and training and
maritime business.
Capt. Tutuianu as President of the organization addressed the participants
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and opened the assembly. He presented the guests and then gave the floor to Capt.
Ivan Conev, who as chairman of Bulgarian Shipmasters’ Association addressed
the audience with the topic “The personal view of the importance of having and
being part of a professional national association.” He was followed by Capt. Dimitar
Dimitrov, Deputy President of CESMA who spoke about “The benefit of having
international representation in organizations like CESMA or IFSMA”.
Dr. eng. Ovidiu Cupsa, Director General CERONAV, Romanian Maritime
Training Center presented the present standards of competence of seamen and
ship masters and the challenges Romanian maritime professionals face nowadays.
Capt. Romeo Stavar Vergea, President of Romanian Crewing Association explained
the possibilities for cooperation between manning agencies and professional
organizations and pinpointed the importance of mutual understanding and sharing
of information.
Prof. dr. eng. Costel Stancha, Dean of Navigation Faculty in Romanian
Naval and Maritime Academy gave the last speech of the first part of the seminar
explaining mentoring and its role in maritime education and training and especially
the specific position of ships’ captains on board merchant ships and the importance
for developing professional young officers. The first part of the meeting ended with
a fruitful discussion followed by finger buffet. The second part of the assembly
continued with presentations of Capt. Vireil Titimeaua and Capt. Adrian Pica about
difficulties that Romanian captains meet in the Romanian maritime legislation and
bureaucratic obstacles. The seminar finished with a discussion and was followed
by administrative closed session about membership in international organizations
and elections.
CESMA presented its aims, history, its place within non-governmental
organizations in Europe and the world, and its participation in various European
projects as SAGMAS, MARNIS and others. The members of CESMA were
presented to Romanian captains and also the decisions of the latest annual
general assemblies. An invitation to RSA was made by Capt. Dimitar Dimitrov to
join CESMA and to be present in the next CESMA AGA in Rijeka, Croatia on May
09-10, 2020.
Capt. Dimitar Dimitrov, PHD, AFNI, CESMA Deputy President
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Summary of symposium in NVKK
Safe sailing with (out) cyber threats
Speakers:
1) Mr. Jeroen de Jonge/moderator and from Royal Dutch Navy and TNO Cyber
threats and Geopolitics.
2) Mrs. Sarah Olierook, senior advisor staff Port of Rotterdam harbor division.
Cyber security in the Port
3) Mr. Glenn Rittereiser, Cyber security officer Maersk Ship-owners answer on
security threats
4) Mr.Jeroen Kortsmit, general manager JRC Europe and Alphatron Marine
Cyber security protection of vessels nautical equipment
Ad.1) Worldwide, cyber-attacks continue and are implemented by several
foreign countries on virtual items of other countries. Now it should/will/shall be
considered as an attack on the sovereignty of other nations. What can be done to
protect us against these threats? The Royal Dutch Navy department has created a
special department to protect virtual items against cyber attacks and crimes. It will
also increase crew of awareness of cyber threats, however, because it is a military
organization, the methodology is confidential.
Ad.2) Port of Rotterdam consists of a variety of organizations and stakeholders,
all with their own digital systems and not efficiently connected. A program has been
commenced by the Port of Rotterdam to improve stakeholder awareness of cyberattacks,
as it is now an almost forgotten area for some. Some stakeholders are still
working with the XP system, plug in memory-sticks are used from one computer to
the other, increasing the risk of spreading computer viruses to computer systems
and so on. Agents are using plug in memory-sticks on vessels on board computer
systems for load/discharging data with possible virus infection of the systems. The
program is making the parties aware now of the threats in the port of cyber-attacks
by criminals for randsomware and malware on the computers in port and on board.
Ad.3) The cyber attack that occurred in 2017 at Maersk, worldwide infected
computers from Maersk, sea-going operations, especially container trade, missing
containers, terminal positions, destinations, planning etc. It was all together a
costly and time consuming operation for Maersk to recover all information and
data, after a period of time, using the old means of operations again for a while
(fax-printers, telephone etc) for the recovery and continuation of cargo operations
and the setup of a whole new system with up to date IT. Upgrade to Windows
10. It was a long and costly operation to make this new system, starting from the
beginning. The virus was a randsomware virus that originated from Ukraine. No
payment was made to the criminals, but a whole new system was setup. Security
was implemented to ensure that this will never happen again. But the changes are
much less, also an awareness program has been developed for vessels’ crews and
for the terminals. Maersk was not the only firm what was infected by this attack.
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Other much bigger firms were attacked but were not reported worldwide. Because
Maersk is a worldwide operation the cyber-attack had greater impact.
Ad4) JRC equipment is built (handmade) for protion against cyber-attacks
and Alphatron Marine has a special department made for the programs delivered,
for awareness against cyber attacks and how deal with it. Also here is the weakest
link from the chain where the problem starts, so be mindful and use common sense
and be aware of cyber-attacks in vessels on-board systems. Make a program for
on-board training, and delegate a person to take charge and to have access to
certain amount of the IT system (in layers) on-board.
ICS Launches New ISM Guidelines
The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has launched a new edition
of its Guidelines on the Application of the IMO International Safety Management
(ISM) Code, originally published in 1993 with over 50,000 copies sold worldwide.
An expert ICS panel drawn from shipowners and shipmanagers across a
variety of sectors, and with considerable experience of working with ISM, helped
create the new guidelines which look forward to the future, balancing the need to
implement Safety Management Systems (SMS) that further improve safety with
helping crews to do their jobs efficiently.
Mark Rawson, ICS Expert Group Lead, says: “The view from ship operators
was that we should be looking at how we can simplify understanding of the ISM
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Code and the application of its requirements.
“The purpose of ISM, when it was adopted by IMO more than 25 years ago,
was to make it easier and safer for ships’ crews to carry out their work. Today, this
is something which is sometimes overlooked. The industry has changed so much
since the 1990s, and we are now in a very different and far more complex place.
There is much more pressure from external stakeholders – including charterers
and commercial interests, such as banks and underwriters – to use the SMS for
their own purposes. We have therefore sought to provide greater clarity on what
ICS believes is actually the key point of ISM Code compliance.”
The new fifth edition of the Guidelines includes comprehensive advice on
compliance with the Code for anyone involved with developing, implementing and
maintaining the SMS, including Masters and Designated Persons Ashore (DPA).
The revised Guidelines are divided into three sections. The first outlines the
significant stakeholders and objectives; the second explores the experience of
companies with ISM Code implementation and the importance of risk assessment
and commitment to best practice; and the third features new ideas on how to replicate
success and use the ISM Code to deal with new technologies and complexities in
the future.
The ICS Expert Group has focused on using simple English, for clarity and
ease of use.
ICS recommends that a copy of the new Guidelines is carried on board every
commercially trading ship and that a copy is held within every shipping company
office.
New Polar Operating Guidelines
In November, the ICS and the Oil Companies International Marine Forum
(OCIMF) jointly released guidelines to support shipping companies intending to
operate in polar waters develop a Polar Water Operational Manual (PWOM) so
their ships can be issued with a Polar Ship Certificate.
Appendix II of the IMO Polar Code provides a model PWOM, but ICS and
OCIMF have recognized that additional guidance is necessary to help shipping
companies to develop a quality PWOM that is truly fit for purpose.
Guidelines for the Development of a Polar Water Operational Manual was
prepared by expert contributors with in-depth experience of operating ships in polar
waters, as well as knowledge of the challenges faced by seafarers on board. Topics
addressed include: identifying hazards; understanding operational limitations;
updating procedures; upgrading equipment and systems; understanding relevant
legislation and ensuring that the results of assessments are fully addressed in the
PWOM.
By The Maritime Executive 2019-12-02 17:01:30
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Seafarers Need Games, Shore Leave and Internet
A recent study by Helen Sampson and Neil Ellis from SIRC (Seafarers
International Research Centre), Cardiff, for IOSH (Institution of Occupational
Safety and Health), looks at the mental health and well-being of seafarers.
New research by Cardiff University urges shipping companies to provide more
amenities for seafarers. Specifically, the report states that they should be provided
with internet access and :
• At least one activity onboard, such as basketball, squash or swimming;
• At least four activities from table tennis, darts, barbecues, karaoke, bingo,
and card and board games ;
• A gym with at least three pieces of equipment ;
• At least two facilities from a sauna, a book and DVD library, satellite TV with
cabins and a library of interactive video games ;
• Comfortable mattresses and furnishings within cabins ;
• Shore leave at every opportunity for all ranks ;
• Varied, good quality food.
The study, funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health
(IOSH), involved over 1,500 seafarers completing a questionnaire and face-to-face
interviews with a small group of seafarers, employers, maritime charities and other
stakeholders. Lack of internet access, long periods away from friends and family,
poor accommodation and food were among the leading causes of concern for
those working at sea. Professor Helen Sampson, who led the study, says there is
evidence that recent-onset psychological disorders are increasing among serving
seafarers, yet more than half (55 percent) of employers said they had not introduced
any policies or practices to address mental health for a decade.
When questioned in an interview about suffering from mental ill-health, one
seafarer said : “Between pressure, workload, no days off and you are a gazillion
miles away from home with limited communication, what do you think is going to
happen ?” Another said : “Three months on land is nothing. You can’t see your kids
grow up, you can’t see anything. You are just like an uncle coming and going.”
Sampson, Director of Cardiff University’s Seafarers International Research
Centre, based in the School of Social Sciences, said: “It is all too easy for seafarers
working out on the deep ocean to be invisible to those ashore. Their remoteness
allows for abuse to go undetected.
Sometimes seafarers are subjected to bullying and harassment by superiors
and colleagues on board. However many employers also mistreat seafarers by
failing to provide decent and humane living conditions which promote good mental
well-being.“ The report concludes that the provision of free internet access would
make the most significant contribution to improving the mental health and well-being
of those working onboard ships. In addition, organizations are urged to provide
self-help guidance on improving mental resilience, provide contracts that balance
work and leave time, introduce and enforce anti-bullying and harassment policies,
train officers on creating a positive on-board atmosphere and set up confidential
counselling services.
Summary and full reports can be downloaded on : https://www.iosh.com/
seafarerswellbeing
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CESMA LOGBOOK (2019 – 2)
We were represented at the following occasions:
25-26 SEPTEMBER - HELSINKI – IFSMA AGA
11 OCTOBER – MAMAIA, ROMANIA - CESMA PRESENTED DUR
ING AGA OF ROMANIAN SHIPMASTERS ASSOCIATION
On the front page:
The hybrid ferry Berlin (file image courtesy Scandlines),
The Maritime Executive
World Maritime Day 2019, IMO web site
FROM THE EDITOR
• Ancona – Mooring line breaks and hits shipping agent - On Monday
10 June, a fatal accident happened in the port of Ancona, when a mooring line
broke and struck a shipping agent. The serious accident occurred at quay 23 of
the new dock where container ships dock. A 34-year-old shipping agent, father of
two children and employee of an agency in Ancona, died after being hit in the neck
by a mooring rope made of synthetic fibre used to secure the ships at the quay,
which suddenly broke. The agent was witnessing the operations of loading and
unloading the goods from a container ship. Investigations are being carried out to
reconstruct the tragedy and to understand if the mooring procedure had already
been completed. The emergency medical service and the Yellow Cross health
officials intervened, but were only able to ascertain the death of the port worker.
Capt. Stein Inge Dahn, President of the European Maritime Pilots’ Association
(EMPA), offered his sincere condolences, on behalf of EMPA: “We are deeply
saddened to hear of this terrible loss and extend our heartfelt condolences to his
family, friends and colleagues during this difficult time.”
(Photo credit: Indy Pauwels)
http://empa-pilots.eu/news/aancona-a-mooring-line-breaks-and-hits-shippingagent
16
AIMS OF THE ORGANISATION
• The European Maritime Pilot Association (EMPA) and European Tugowners
Association (ETA) presents a new video on safe and efficient harbour
towage operations.These guidelines described in the video were defined in
close collaboration from both associations. This animation summarises the
necessary steps that tugmasters, pilots and vessel captains should take
in order to ensure the safety and efficiency of port towage operations.To
reach the highest safety standards, good communication between all the
participants in the mooring operations is a must. Essential information like
communication channels, vessel deficiencies or the vessel´s safe pushing
points must be included in the towage plan and shared with all the parties.
This clear communication creates an efficient and safe working environment,
helping captains, tugmasters and pilots to enhance safe manoeuvres in ports.
http://empa-pilots.eu/news/empa-presents-new-safe-harbour-towage-operations-
guidelines
• ////
(abridged)
AIMS OF THE ORGANISATION
• TO WORLDWIDE PROTECT THE PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS AND
STATUS OF EUROPEAN SEAGOING SHIPMASTERS.
• TO PROMOTE MARITIME SAFETY AND PROTECT THE MARINE
ENVIRONMENT.
• TO PROMOTE ESTABLISHMENT OF EFFECTIVE RULES WHICH
PROVIDE HIGH PROFESSIONAL MARITIME STANDARDS AND PROPER
MANNING SCALES FOR VESSELS UNDER AN EUROPEAN NATION
FLAG.
• TO INFORM THE PUBLIC IN THE EU ABOUT DEVELOPMENTS IN
THE EUROPEAN MARITIME INDUSTRY AND THOSE CONCERNING
SHIPMASTERS IN PARTICULAR.
• TO CO-OPERATE WITH OTHER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME
ORGANISATIONS.
• TO RETAIN AND DEVELOP THE HIGHEST MARITIME KNOWLEDGE AND
EXPERIENCE IN EUROPE.
• TO BE INVOLVED IN RESEARCH CONCERNING MARITIME MATTERS
IF APPLICABLE IN CO- OPERATION WITH OTHER EUROPEAN
INSTITUTIONS AND/OR ORGANISATIONS.
• TO ASSIST MEMBER SHIPMASTERS WHO ENCOUNTER DIFFICULTIES
IN PORTS WITHIN THE REACH OF NATIONS REPRESENTED BY CESMA
MEMBER ASSOCIATIONS
17
• TO PROMOTE THE SEAFARING PROFESSION IN EU MEMBER STATES
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION: EURO 16,- PER SEAGOING MASTER (WITH
A MINIMUM OF 25)
EURO 8,- PER SEAGOING MASTER FOR ASSOCIATED MEMBER
ASSOCIATIONS (WITH A MINIMUM OF 25)
LIST OF CESMA MEMBERS AND REPRESENTATIVES
MEMBER REPR
VDKS
CAPT. W.VON PRESSENTIN
PALMAILLE 29
TEL: 0049 40 384981
FAX:0049 40 3892114
GERMANY 22767 HAMBURG E-MAIL: vdks.office@t-online.de
MEMBER REPR CAPT. B. DERENNES TEL: 0033 2 98463760
AFCAN RUE DE BASSAM
France 29200 BREST E-MAIL: courrier@afcan.org
MEMBER REPR CAPT. F. VANOOSTEN E-MAIL:vanoosten.francis@wanadoo.fr
HYDROS 201 RUE RENE CASTELIN
France 59240 DUNKERQUE
MEMBER REPR CAPT. L.J.H. GEENEVASEN TEL: 0031 512 510528
NVKK WASSENAARSEWEG 2 MOB.: 0031646260098
CAPT.H.AMMERLAAN
NETHERLANDS 2596 CH THE HAGUE E-MAIL: nvkk@introweb.nl
MEMBER REPR CAPT. M. CAROBOLANTE TEL: 0039 040 362364
CTPC VIA MAZZINI 30 MOB.: 0039 334 7400488
ITALY 34121 TRIESTE E-MAIL: collegio69@collegioditrieste.191.it
MEMBER REPR CAPT. G. LETTICH TEL: 0039 010 2472746
CNPC VICO DELL’ AGNELLO 2/28
ITALY 16124 GENOA E-MAIL: info@collegionazionalecapitani.it
MEMBER REPR CAPT. C. TOMEI TEL: 0039 010 5761424
USCLAC
ITALY
VIA XX SETTEMBRE 21/10
16121 GENOA
FAX: 0039 010 5535129
E-MAIL: segreteria@usclac.it
MEMBER REPR CAPT. L. TRIGGIANI TEL: 0039 3483365010
IYM MOLO CENTRALE BANCHINA PORTO
ITALY 17025 LOANO (SV) E-MAIL:italianyachtmasters@hotmail.com
18
MEMBER REPR
ACCMM SPAIN
CAPT. M. BADELL SERRA
CARRER DE SARDENYA 259 1-4
08013 BARCELONA
TEL: 0034 934089288
MOB.: 0034 680321138
E-MAIL: info@capitansmercants.com
MEMBER REPR CAPT.J. ZARRAGOIKOETXEA TEL: 0034 94 416 65 06
AVCCMM C/BAILEN, 5 PLANTA – 1 MOB: 0034636 44 90 54
SPAIN 48003 BILBAO E-MAIL: avccmm@avccmm.org
MEMBER REPR CAPT.B. BAERT TEL +32 475435942
KBZ ITALIELEI 72
BELGIUM ANTWERP E-MAIL:secretary-general@kbz-crmb.be
MEMBER REPR CAPT. B. KAVANAGH TEL: +353 214335637
IIMM
IRELAND
NATIONAL MARITIME
COLLEGE
RINGASKIDDY / CORK
E-MAIL:bill.kavanagh@nmci.ie
MEMBER REPR CAPT. G. RIBARIC TEL(GSM): +386 31 375 823
ZPU
SLOVENIA
OBALA 55
SI – 6320 PORTOROZ E-MAIL: zpu.slo@siol.net
MEMBER REPR CAPT. I. CONEV TEL : +359 888 435977
BSMA
BULGARIA
49B CHATALDZHA BUL
9002 VARNA
E-MAIL: chairman@bsma-bg.org
MEMBER REPR
LKKA
CAPT. J. SPRIDZANS
TRIJADIBAS STREET 5
TEL: +371 67099400
FAX: + 371 67323100
LATVIA RIGA, LV-10 48 E-MAIL: jazeps.spridzans@lja.lv
MEMBER REPR
ZHUPK
CAPT. I. SOSIC
TRG PAPE ALEKSANDRA III,3
E-MAIL: udruga.kapetana@zd.t-com.hr
CROATIA 23000 ZADAR - HRVATSKA
MEMBER REPR
UPKCG
CAPT. J. MILUTIN PELUZICA
b.b
E-MAIL : captain@t-com.me TEL : +382 32
304 672
MONTENEGRO 85330 KOTOR FAX :+382 325 107
MEMBER REPR CAPT. J.LIEPUONIUS E-MAIL : jurukapitonuklubas@gmail.com
LCC AGLUNOS g.5 TEL : mobile +37069875704
LITHUANIA KLAIPEDA/ LT- 93235
MEMBER REPR CAPT. J. TEIXEIRA E-MAIL :sincomar.fesmar@net.vodafone.pt
SINCOMAR CAIA DE ROCHA TEL: +351 213918180
PORTUGAL CONDE D OBIDA
ARMAZEM 113
1350 352 LISBON
MEMBER REPR CAPT. S. SUNDBERG E-MAIL: stig.sundberg@pp1.inet.fi
HELSINKI VEHNAKUJA 4 TEL: +358 40 5944954
SHIPMASTERS 06400 PORVOO
FINLAND SF-FINLAND